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Post-it notes for the tech classroom

YI love using post-it notes in my classroom.  They are the perfect place to jot down 'one thing you have learnt today', or 'one thing you wish you knew better'. You know the sort of thing I mean - a plenary tool that you can keep and peruse to guide you for your next lesson.  On occasion, I pull out the post-it notes a week or so later and challenge my students to tell me if they now know 'how to form.....?'.  In terms of AFL and a type of exit ticket, post-it notes do a great job.
Why then, if this lovely paper tool works well, do we need to do anything else.  Why do we need to 'techify' it? 

For me, it's simple and this list might help you share my enthusiasm.
1. The ability to save the post-it notes electronically.
2. Order and re-order them
3. Re-organise them so as to highlight better a particular point.

4. Share the post-it's with the class as a PowerPoint or PDF via email (or google classroom if you have it). 

5. Highlight a particular issue on one of the post-its to share with the rest of the class. 


6. Start your next lesson with the best/most-interesting/thought-provoking post-it note.
7. End your next lesson with best/most interesting/thought-provoking post-it note.
8. Embed one or more of the post-its in a PowerPoint for the following lesson. Students love to see their work on the board and this is a really powerful way to share their work.  

In addition, it is so easy to use.  Once the post-it notes are on the board you simple open up the post-it app and snap a photo of them post-its.  It's a simple open and click.

So, if you fancy having a go, download the app (for free) and let me know how you get on in the comments box below.


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